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before


before
1/6

what we did & why

1 Addressed the client’s concerns upfront

The main taglines emphasize security, protection and confidence — words that tap into the underlying motivations behind hiring a company like Creditfacts. Before visitors get a chance to explore the details, we had to give them a clear reason to stay.

2 Put a twist on the classics

Blue is often the go-to color for companies in the technology and corporate sectors. But that doesn’t mean blue has to be boring. We added bright green and orange accents and included dynamic background images to breathe life into the brand without detracting from its professional image.

3 Divided visitors into two groups

Visitors looking for tenant screening are probably not interested in employee screening, and vice versa. Why make them look through content that isn’t relevant? There are two benefits to naming the groups who would hire Creditfacts — property managers, HR administrators, etc. One, the visitor can identify which services they need quickly and easily. Two, Google searches often involve those terms, making it more likely that visitors land on Creditfacts and not one of their competitors.

4 Made the registration and ordering process easy to understand

To prevent visitors from becoming overwhelmed and usure of how to begin working with Creditfacts, we included “3 Steps to Security” which explains the process at a glance and invites visitors to find out more.

5 Included testimonials

The best way to earn a prospective client’s trust is to give them evidence of your good work. We noticed that not too many of Creditfacts’ competitors included testimonials on their sites, so we took the opportunity to gather feedback from past clients and stand out from the crowd.

6 Simplified navigation

The old version of the site scattered information over too many pages, so we wanted to condense everything to reduce the time a visitor has to spend looking for what they need. Limiting the navigation options allowed us to make the experience of browsing the site more straightforward and user-friendly.

1 Invested in better photography

Diane came to us because she had a new book coming out and knew that more people would be visiting her website. To balance the conceptual and abstract nature her work, the images had to be vivid enough to grab the visitor’s attention. We featured high-quality photographs of nature and suggested that Diane re-shoot her portraits.

2 Developed consistency in typography

The fonts we chose for everything form the logo, to the taglines and small text are visually consistent. These details and decisions, for the fonts as well as other design elements, all work together to create a cohesive aesthetic that reflects Diane’s personal brand.

3 Made color scheme more nuanced

Diane wanted to keep purple in the new color scheme and we agreed — purple tones suit the theraputic nature of her work. We expanded the palette to range from deep violets to pale pinks, giving the design depth and complexity. Rounded edges, soft transitions, and flowing lines all contribute to create an inviting browsing experience.

4 Featured feedback from clients

Diane’s website is not about her — it’s about how she can help others. The quotations from clients and health professionals give her credibility and allow visitors to see how she can help them. Emphasizing feedback breaks up the smaller bits of text, adding rhythm and eloquence to the layout.

5 Simplified navigation

The old site had too many options in the navigation menu, which should be understandable at a glance, especially when the site has a lot of text. We narrowed down the menu to five options and distributed links throughout the home page that lead visitors to other pages.

6 Included calls to action

The purpose of the site is not only to introduce Diane’s work and philosophy but to sell her products. We had to make it easy for visitors to buy her book and schedule a one-on-one session. The calls to action — Buy Now and Book a Session — are prominent without being pushy.

1 Aimed for contemporary luxury

Adagio Teas wanted to re-design the packaging of their Masters Collection, a series of teas that were significantly more expensive than their other products. The tins had to look expensive, too. We thought of the teas as high-end perfume bottles, valued for their exterior as much as the contents inside.

2 Made the images relevant

Each of the teas has its own story — where it comes from, who harvests it, and how its flavor is unique. The images we used for each design pick up on that story without being too literal. We wanted the visual impact to be lush and inviting, but also offer a second layer of meaning.

3 Kept it consistent yet varied

To prevent visitors from becoming overwhelmed and usure of how to begin working with Creditfacts, we included “3 Steps to Security” which explains the process at a glance and invites visitors to find out more.

4 Fused the old and the new

Adagio already had a clean, contemporary aesthetic, so we tried to strike a balance between minimal labels and rich backgrounds. The images evoke tradition — painting, architecture, ritual — but the selection of fonts and focus on details stop them from venturing into vintage territory.